Review: Science is Magic

A child with a copy of Science is Magic.

This is a paid collaboration with DK Books.

In case you didn’t know already, we’re currently in British Science Week. So what better time to review this title recently published by DK?

Written by science presenter and comedian, Steve Mould, Science is Magic teaches kids the science behind a range of magic tricks. I’ve always been a keen believer in making education fun and this book achieves just that.

Among its pages are no fewer than 28 kid-friendly science experiments that should wow young readers. Each one is explained in easy-to-follow steps and with eye-catching photography and design.

A double-page spread of Science is Magic.

In addition, the majority involve items you’re likely to already have at home. And, of course, every trick includes a scientific explanation of the forces or reactions behind it.

So, as well as learning tricks to dazzle their friends with, children learn some of the fundamentals of science.

There are also profiles of some legendary science-based tricks including Harry Houdini’s water escape and David Copperfield’s disappearing Statue of Liberty.

Of course, you can’t review a book of magic tricks without having a go at a couple of them. The six-year-old never needs much persuading and immediately asked if we could try a few.

A child trying a science-based magic trick.

First of all, we attempted the pepper-repelling finger trick. For this one, you fill a plate with water then cover it with black pepper.

Placing a finger in the water achieves nothing, but doing so with a drop of washing up liquid on your finger should cause the pepper to move away.

Now it has to be said that our pepper was a lot thicker than that in the book, but the trick still worked.

As you can see from the image above, the granules that had stayed on the surface moved to the edge of the plate. There was an audible “Wow” too!

A child balancing a ball on warm air from a hairdryer.

Next, we tried the floating ping-pong ball trick. Full disclosure: we couldn’t find one! We had something similar albeit bigger though so tried that. And, again, it worked.

It was brilliant watching his face, both when the ball first appeared to hover in front of him and how it still stayed in the air when he tilted the hairdryer!

Entertaining and inspiring in equal measure, Science is Magic is a brilliant book that should nurture a love of both subjects.

Some of the tricks require adult supervision but, to be honest, why wouldn’t you want to join in? We really enjoyed having a go at the tricks and are looking forward to trying the rest of them!

Science is Magic has an RRP of £12.99.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.